Inside Influence Report

2015-04-29_9-59-15

2014 Awards

Started in 2008, the Robert B. Cialdini Award recognizes the author(s) of a publication that uses field methods and demonstrates relevance  to outside groups. This award is designed to recognize the publication that best explicates social psychological phenomena principally through the use  of field research methods and settings and that thereby demonstrates the relevance of the discipline to communities outside of academic social psychology within a given year at the SPSP Annual Convention.

Recipients of this award split a $2400 honorarium and each receive an accompanying plaque, which are presented at the annual Awards Ceremony held at the SPSP Annual Convention. This award was endowed by Robert Cialdini through the Foundation for Personality and Social Psychology.

From left to right is Valerie Purdie-Vaughns, Geoffrey Cohen, Kevin Binning, Julio Garcia, Robert Cialdini, David Sherman, and Kimberly Hartson

From left to right is Valerie Purdie-Vaughns, Geoffrey Cohen, Kevin Binning, Julio Garcia, Robert Cialdini, David Sherman, and Kimberly Hartson

The winners of the 2014 Robert B. Cialdini Award are:

David Sherman, University of California, Santa Barbara

Geoffrey Cohen, Stanford University

Kimberly Hartson, University of California, Santa Barbara

Julio Garcia, University of Colorado

Valerie Purdie-Vaughns

Kevin Binning, University of Pittsburgh

Dave Nussbaum, University of Chicago

Suzanne Taborsky-Barba, University of Colorado

Sarah Tomassetti, University of Colorado

TITLE:

Deflecting the trajectory and changing the narrative: How self-affirmation affects academic performance and motivation under identity threat. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104, 591-618.

SUMMARY:

This article, in The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, reflects the research of the impact of positive self-affirmation on academic performance by students who were stereotyped or who felt threatened by their ethnic identity.  The two groups studied were middle school student of Latino and European descent.

The results found that Latino students who participated in positive self-affirmation exercises increased their academic performance while students of European descent were unaffected.  They concluded that the use of positive affirmation exercises diminished the Latino students identity threat and that this practice can be used to even the academic playing field.

Congratulations the the entire team!

By Steve Martin, CMCT (not that Steve Martin)automobiles

What sort of business traveler are you? Are you the sort who likes to keep yourself to yourself, who welcomes the solitude that an hour or two in an aircraft offers—to catch up on paperwork, read or, just be alone with your thoughts without the interruptions that typically blight your busy day?

Or are you a more social traveler? Someone who seeks out connections with others, always alert to the possibility of meeting interesting new people. People who, if you’re lucky, might turn out to be useful business contacts in the future.

Read more ...

By Steve Martin, CMCT & Noah Goldstein, PhD.Paper Fortune Teller

At first glance, little appears to differentiate Berkshire Hathaway annual stockholders reports from other major corporations’. (Except perhaps the results – a $1000 investment in Berkshire stock in 1965 is worth around $200,000 today).

A closer look reveals something almost hidden in plain sight in the letter to the stockholders, trading commentary, and other financial information. Even in years in which Berkshire has been more successful than imaginable, often the first few pages of Warren Buffet’s Chairman’s report will draw the shareholders’ attention to a snag, strain or shortcoming that has occurred that past year.

In a reputation-obsessed world, too often we present only positive attributes and strengths while sweeping flops and failures under the rug.   Mr. Buffet, instead, draws attention to a downside early in his address. Does he have it wrong?

Read more ...

resolutionkindle fire

 

 

 

 

 

 

We want to help our followers keep their New Year’s resolutions using one of the Six Principles of Persuasion.

The Principle of Commitment & Consistency states:

“Once we have made a choice or taken a stand, we will encounter personal and interpersonal pressures to behave consistently with that commitment”

Commitments that are made public create more lasting change. The more public, the stronger the sense of commitment, and thus the more likely you are to stick with your commitment.

To that end, we are hosting a Twitter contest to increase the likelihood you will see your resolutions through to the end of 2015 and beyond.

Simply tweet your resolution using the hashtag, #CIALDINI2015 and you will be entered into a random drawing to win a Kindle Fire HDX.

The contest starts now and runs until midnight January 15th, 2015 PST.  The winner will be announced on January 16th!  Good luck!

 

 

 

 

By:  Steve Martin, CMCT

iStock_000006595143SmallPersuasion researchers have consistently demonstrated that the most successful strategies that influence the decisions and behaviors of others gain their persuasive strength by triggering one of just three simple human motivations:

1) The motivation to make effective decisions efficiently.

2) The motivation to affiliate with and gain the approval of others.

3) The motivation to see ourselves in a positive light.

In two previous INSIDE INFLUENCE REPORTS, I reviewed the first and second of these motivations and provided examples of the small changes that can activate them. In the third part of this series of articles I’ll take a closer look at the third of these motivations; the need to behave in ways that allow us to be seen in the best possible light.

Read more ...

bullies

 

 

 

 

 

By:  Steve Martin, CMCT

In last month’s post we claimed that, despite an abundance of strategies used to influence the decisions and behaviors of others, researchers have found that the most successful strategies gain their persuasive strength by triggering one or more of three simple human motivations.

These motivations are:

1. Making effective decisions efficiently

2. Affiliating with and gain the approval of others

3. Seeing ourselves in a positive light

For this month’s IIR let’s take a closer look at the second of these, our motivation to affiliate with, and gain the approval of others.

Read more ...


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"…one of social psychology’s true pioneers."
Daniel Gilbert, Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, and author of Stumbling on Happiness

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